Inizio > Pubblicazioni > Carbajo N˙˝ez Martedì 22 settembre 2020

Informazione sulla pubblicazione:
Everything is Connected. Integral Ecology and Communication in the Digital Age

 
 
 
 
Foto Carbajo N˙˝ez MartÝn , Everything is Connected. Integral Ecology and Communication in the Digital Age, Ed. Media House, Delhi, 2020 .

From a humanist perspective, this book puts in relation integral ecology and communication; that is, the Web of Life and our life on the Web. "Everything is connected." The Covid-19 pandemic has uncovered once more that all creation is joined together in a common fate. We will survive only if we collaborate for the common good, eagerly accepting the fact of being dependent on each other.

Unfortunately, we have damaged the Web of Life and we are not properly inhabiting the digital Web. Thus, the objective of this book is to identify the theological, anthropological, and ethical bases that will allow us to overcome the current technocratic ideology and to assume a more relational paradigm.

This Edition by:  Media House® -- on Facebook
ISBN: 978-93-88989-82-4

To order it online: eBook  - Amazon 
Edtions: SpanishItalianPortugueseEnglish, French & Polish
Segnalazione in Studia Moralia 
- Presentation: Rome 27.02.2020: Faggioni: video brevecompleto; Jaime Campos: video ShortFull; - Final thanks
- Presentazionetion in Lima (Peru) Nov 29, 2019  - - (Video invitation) 
- Report at the Web of the OFM General Curia: ESITEN - Website Alfonsianum
 
 + info ecologia

Index

ABBREVIATIONS
Biblical books
3. Writings of St. Francis
4. Franciscan Sources and Authors
5. Bibliographical and common
 
INTRODUCTION

I. A LOOK AT OUR WORLD

1. THE WEB OF LIFE

   1.1. THE ECOLOGICAL CRISIS IS A FAMILY CRISIS
1.1.1. The abuse of creation begins when God is excluded
1.1.2. In the family, the human being develops his identity
1.1.3. School of communication in the logic of gift
1.1.4. Fundamental structure of human and integral ecology

   1.2. THE THESIS OF HUMAN EXCEPTION
1.2.1. The anthropocentric ideology
1.2.2. Ontic dualism
1.2.3. Ontological dualism
1.2.4. Domination and throwaway culture
 
   1.3. HUMAN ECOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION
1.3.1. A forum for dialogue and social awareness
1.3.2. An interactive communication based on personal relationships
1.3.3. Technical dimension vs. anthropological dimension
 
   1.4. NATURE IS A NETWORK OF RELATIONSHIPS
1.4.1. A dialectic of permanent conflict
1.4.2. In nature, cooperation is more important than conflict
1.4.3. The principles of the CST from an ecological perspective

2. LIFE ON THE WEB
   2.1. GETTING OUT OF OURSELVES OR BEING SELF-ABSORBED
2.1.1. The media ecosystem
2.1.2. The challenges of the global village
2.1.3. Simulacrum and narcissism
2.1.4. More connected but more alone

   2.2. ANTHROPOLOGICAL REALM IN WHICH IDENTITY IS BUILT
2.2.1. Personal identity and social networks
2.2.2. The importance of the body
2.2.3. Hyper-connected and hyper-accelerated
2.2.4. Depersonalizing superficialityç
 
   2.3. THE DIGITAL FRATERNITY
2.3.1. Affectionate proximity and encounter
2.3.2. Eagerness to share and to be recognized
2.3.3. Uprooted and caught in the Net
 
   2.4. THE MEDIA AT THE SERVICE OF TRUTH AND DIALOGUE
2.4.1. Truth in relation to goodness and beauty
2.4.2. At the service of dialogue and socio-environmental education
2.4.3. The need of being open to diversity

II. CHRISTIAN FOUNDATION OF COMMUNICATION

3. THEOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL BASES

   3.1. BEFORE THE CREATIO EX NIHILO, COMMUNICATION ALREADY EXISTED
3.1.1. The Trinitarian communion: origin, way, and destiny of all that exists
3.1.2. “In the beginning was the Word”
3.1.3. Christ is the perfect Communicator
3.1.4. The Church "is a network woven together by Eucharistic communion”

   3.2. THE HUMAN PERSON IS A DIALOGICAL AND RELATIONAL BEING
3.2.1. Created for dialogue and communication
3.2.2. Relations based on freedom and gratuitousness
3.2.3. Communication as self-giving
3.2.4. The need for mysticism and spirituality

   3.3. BASES FOR A COSMIC FRATERNITY
3.3.1. Individuality instead of individualism
3.3.2. Sin breaks communication and communion
3.3.3. Ecological conversion
3.3.4. Reconciliation with all creation

   3.4. CREATION IS LANGUAGE, COMMUNICATION, ENCOUNTER, RELATIONSHIP
3.4.1. All reality is dialogical
3.4.2. Each creature bears in itself a Trinitarian structure
3.4.3. “This world is pregnant with God!”
3.4.4. Sacramental dimension

4. “DO NOT BE AFRAID OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES!”
   4.1. GIFTS OF GOD
4.1.1. A critical approach to the media
4.1.2. From neutral instruments to reality configurators
4.1.3. Mental and media pollution
   4.2. THE MEDIA FACILITATE (AND SHAPE) OUR RELATIONSHIPS
4.2.1. Loneliness, indifference, and lack of empathy
4.2.2 Artificial emotions
4.2.3. Far from nature, far from the poor
 
   4.3. VOCATION AND SOCIAL MISSION OF COMMUNICATION PROFESSIONALS
4.3.1. Information is a public right and a social need
4.3.2. Freedom of speech and freedom of information
4.3.3. At the service of the person
 
   4.3.4. At the service of the Church
   4.4. ETHICAL CRITERIA FOR COMMUNICATIONS
4.4.1. Truth, sincerity, and honesty
4.4.2. Respecting Human dignity, its pace, and its integral development
4.4.3. A public forum for active and responsible participation
4.4.4. Balanced proportion of formation, information, and entertainment

III. TOWARDS A RELATIONAL PARADIGM

5. RESTORING COMMUNICATION IN THE COMMON HOUSE

    5.1. THE SACRAMENT OF RECONCILIATION AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE EARTH
5.1.1. Sacramental reconciliation with nature
5.1.2. Examination of conscience about ecological sins
5.1.3. Contrition and conversion of heart
5.1.4. Confession
5.1.5. Satisfaction
5.1.6. Restitution and ecological justice
5.1.7. Celebration of the restored fraternity
 
   5.2. OVERCOMING THE THESIS OF HUMAN EXCEPTION
5.2.1. Overcoming ontological dualism
5.2.2. Overcoming ontic dualism
5.2.3. From information about oneself to narration
5.2.4. Learning to narrate
 
   5.3. GROWING IN ECOLOGICAL EDUCATION AND RELATIONAL SKILLS
5.3.1. Cultivating ecological virtues and fraternal relationships
5.3.2. Eco-spirituality
5.3.3. Towards an integral ecology
 
   5.4. DIALOGUE AND LISTENING AT ALL LEVELS
5.4.1. Hear, O Israel
5.4.2. Dialogue and communication in the religious realm
5.4.3. Contemplating beauty and the personal mystery
 
6. RESPONSIBLY INHABITING THE DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT
   6.1. NEW TECHNOLOGIES, EVANGELIZATION, AND PASTORAL CARE
6.1.1. The priest and the parish in the digital age
6.1.2. An interactive evangelization
6.1.3. The media's potentiality for evangelization
6.1.4. Integrating the message in the media culture
6.1.5. The use of new technologies in the liturgy and in pastoral ministry

   6.2. COMMUNICATION IN PASTORAL PROJECTS
6.2.1. From Communio et Progressio to Aetatis Novae
6.2.2. A complex relationship between the media and the Church
6.2.3. An opportunity for mutual enrichment
 
   6.3. CONSECRATED LIFE AND DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT
6.3.1. Access to the Internet in religious communities
6.3.2. A wise and balanced use
6.3.3. Retreat and enclosure
6.3.4. Experts in human relations
6.3.5. Life in fraternity: richness and challenge
6.3.6. Digital natives and Digital immigrants
6.3.7. A peculiar style of inhabiting the digital space

   6.4. OTHER GUIDELINES FOR INHABITING THE DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT
6.4.1. Overcoming the "I like" dependency
6.4.2. Developing a mature, active, and sensible interiority
6.4.3. Silence and the "murmuring solitude"
6.4.4. Enhancing the relational dimension
6.4.5. Understanding and welcoming digital natives
6.4.6. Strengthening intrinsic motivations
6.4.7. Other practical indications
CONCLUSION

 



Parole chiave: Ecology, Communication, Digital Age, Journalism

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